museum job (new york)- el museo del barrio

September 2, 2008 § Leave a comment

Received this info and thought I should pass it along. It would be a great place to work, especially if you are interested in Latin American and Caribbean art.

Here’s the info:

Interested in working at El Museo? Please feel free to check out our job opportunities at http://www.elmuseo.org/jobs.html

Also, if you are looking for an internship, El Museo del Barrio relies on the support from Interns for numerous programs, projects, and events throughout the year. Opportunities are available for high school, undergraduate, and graduate students who are considering careers in the arts, education, and museum profession. Positions offer rewarding and valuable learning experiences with chances to meet and interact with new people, and develop overall familiarity with El Museo’s collection and Latin American and Caribbean art and culture.

Go to: http://www.elmuseo.org
Click on EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS (on the left)
Then Click on INTERNSHIP & VOLUNTEER (on top right)

two museum jobs (michigan)

July 29, 2008 § Leave a comment

Click more to see the job descriptions:

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Trust, Distrust, and Social Class in the Black Community (ann arbor)

January 14, 2008 § Leave a comment

Jobs and Housing: Trust, Distrust, and Social Class in the Black Community

Monday, January 21, 2008. 3 – 5 pm.

Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy

Annenberg Auditorium, 1120 Weill Hall

Hosted as part of the University of Michigan’s 2008 Reverend Doctor Martin Luther King, Jr. Symposium.

Mary Pattillo is a Professor of Sociology and African American Studies at Northwestern University. Her most recent book, Black on the Block: The Politics of Race and Class in the City (University of Chicago Press) examines the simultaneous processes of low-income housing construction and gentrification in a black Chicago neighborhood. Pattillo is a founding board member and active participant in Urban Prep Charter Academy, the first all-boys public charter high school in Chicago.

Sandra S. Smith is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. In Lone Pursuit: Distrust and Defensive Individualism Among the Black Poor (Russell Sage Foundation Publications) Smith advances current and enduring debates about black joblessness, highlighting the role of interpersonal distrust dynamics between low-income black jobholders and their jobseeking relations that make cooperation during the process of finding work a problematic affair. In future work, Smith will further interrogate the process of finding work by examining racial and ethnic differences in trust dynamics and exploring the social psychological, cultural, and structural factors that generate these differences.

Both scholars will discuss their books, followed by comments by University of Michigan professor David Harding.

Seminar is co-sponsored by the National Poverty Center.

Reception and booksigning to follow. Free and open to the public.

harriet tubman community organizing position (multi-city)

January 11, 2008 § Leave a comment

The Harriet Tubman Center for the Recruitment and Training of Organizers
is offering its second summer of entry-level positions.

Full-time, paid field training last from June 1st to August 31st.  Upon successful completion of the training, the Tubman Center works to secure  a 6-month fellowship that will lead to a permanent position as an organizer. 

LOCATIONS:
Kalamazoo, Michigan     Battle Creek, Michigan       Detroit, Michigan    Saginaw, Michigan
Upstate New York: Buffalo, Syracuse, Albany, Niagara Falls     

Washington , DC ]


Find out more!
Information Session on Wednesday 16th from 5-6pm, in 1427 Mason Hall.  


Interviews
on Thursday January 17th all day (8:30am – 4:30).  Sign up online at the Career Center Website, or at the information session.

Please send resume and cover letters to R.Ann.Tanner@gmail.com. Application attached. 

Harriet Tubman Center interns work in pairs to complete a total of four public actions in the course of three months.  After a week of intensive classroom training, interns will build relationships with community members, find and develop leaders, and bring the community into the democratic process to make decisions regarding their community.

Qualities. He/she must demonstrate the ability to-
1.    Build relationships in the public arena systematically and strategically.
2.    Discover and articulate self-interest in potential leaders.
3.    Cut issues, strategize and move groups of people into action.
4.    Work with community leaders, including pastors, lay persons, government officials, and others to create plans.
5.    Identify potential leaders, proposition and move them toward training.
6.    Reflect on the process of organizing.
7.    Develop and agitate within the context of a staff team.
8.    Take training from mentors and supervisors.

stories of life on the academic job market

July 9, 2007 § Leave a comment

The Chronicle, a publication about higher education, has a series where people who are on the academic job market write their accounts for all to read.  Some people use their real names, and others use pseudonymns, but everyone lists their degree, field, and institution.  They’re looking for new writers this coming academic year, so if you will be “on the market” why not make a little extra cash writing about it?

As for me, I am at the beginning of this academic path, so I’ll just read the accounts for now, and try to take some advice away from them. At the very least, I think I have learned to have a sense of humor about some of the encounters of “academia.”

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